Tagged: Apologetics

What good is Christian apologetics?

Traffic signsApologetics simply is a reasonable defense of the Christian faith. The word is derived from the Greek noun apologia and means “a defense.” Apologia and its verb form apologeomai are used nearly 20 times in the New Testament, often in the classic legal sense, but more importantly to describe the call of God to all believers to defend the Christian faith with gentleness and respect (1 Peter 3:15-16).

But how is sound doctrine applied practically? Put another way, what good is Christian apologetics?

Apologetics has at least four practical applications. We may use apologetics to:

Build. There is a positive case to be made for Christianity, and apologetics helps us get there.

The Bible, history, archaeology, and other sources help establish that a real person named Jesus burst onto the scene 2,000 years ago. He claimed deity, performed miracles, spoke the truth, modeled compassion, died on a Roman cross, was buried and rose physically on the third day. His coming to earth was the most important event in human history.

Further, apologetics helps us know who God is; who we are; why there is purpose in life; how we can be restored to a right relationship with our Creator; why we can face death without fear; and what God is doing about evil in the world.

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The value of painful memories

sb10063626bc-001The Wall Street Journal recently reported that scientists have zapped an electrical current to people’s brains to erase distressing memories, part of an ambitious quest to better treat ailments such as mental trauma, psychiatric disorders and drug addiction.

Author Gautam Naik explains: “In an experiment, patients were first shown a troubling story, in words and pictures. A week later they were reminded about it and given electroconvulsive therapy [ECT], formerly known as electroshock. That completely wiped out their recall of the distressing narrative” – without erasing other memories.

At least two important questions emerge for Christians. First, if painful memories can be erased, should we seek this therapy? And second, in the afterlife, does God erase our most disturbing recollections?

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Apologetics e-newsletter coming in January

Thank you, Missouri Baptists, for helping bring to life a statewide Christian apologetics ministry in 2013. MBC churches and associations hosted many apologetics weekends and one-day events that covered topics ranging from “How do I know the Bible is true?” to “What do false religions have in common?”

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A new apologetics e-newsletter is coming in January.

Hosts included Pleasant Hill Baptist Church, Jefferson City; Cross Keys Baptist Church, Florissant; Sweetwater Baptist Church, Neosho; First Baptist Church, Mt. Vernon; Southridge Baptist Church, Jefferson City; East Sedalia Baptist Church; New Salem Baptist Church, Ashland; Faith Baptist Church, Festus; First Baptist Church, Lockwood; First Baptist Church, Linn; Black River Baptist Association; and others.

Last month, I was honored to represent Missouri Baptists in a weeklong apologetics-training event for seminary students and pastors at Seminario Teologico Bautista Mexicano in Mexico City. The MBC’s Partnership Missions team, led by Rick Hedger, and the International Mission Board worked together to make this happen. What a great opportunity it was for me to help equip young church leaders to defend the Christian faith.

Events already scheduled in 2014 include participation in the Sowing in Tears (State Evangelism) Conference and the Worldview Conference, as well as numerous church-sponsored events. To schedule an apologetics event at your church or associational office, contact me at rphillips@mobaptist.org or call 573.636.0400 ext. 304.

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10 truths about the return of Jesus

200321147-001Few passages of scripture cause more controversy among evangelical Christians than Rev. 20:1-10, in which John mentions a 1,000-year period six times.  The main point of debate is whether the “millennium” should be understood literally or figuratively.

Generally, those who believe the 1,000 years are literal and in the future are called premillennialists. They look for Christ to return and establish a “millennial kingdom,” or a reign of 1,000 years, after which He puts down Satan’s final revolt, resurrects and judges unbelievers (Christians are judged before the millennium), and creates new heavens and a new earth.

Those who believe Christ is returning after the millennium are called postmillennialists. The 1,000 years are not necessarily a literal time frame, but they represent a period during which much of the world turns to faith in Jesus.

Those who see all references to the 1,000 years as figurative and without merit as a reference point concerning the timing of the Lord’s return are called amilllennialists.

There is diversity within each of these camps as to the order of events surrounding the second coming.

Regardless of where you stand on the issue, it’s important to follow a biblical principle for exploring tough passages: Start with the simple and straightforward teachings of scripture, and seek to understand the difficult passages in the light of the simpler ones.

With that in mind, let’s rally around 10 simple truths regarding the return of Jesus.

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The Apologist’s Tool Kit

apologists_ebook_iconThank you, Missouri Baptists, for enthusiastically supporting the MBC’s new apologetics ministry. Over the last year, I have been privileged to speak or lead workshops in many churches across the state to help Christians “earnestly contend for the faith” (Jude 3).

Topics have ranged from “How do I know the Bible is true?” to “What do false prophets have in common?”

As many of you know, apologetics simply is “a reasonable defense of the Christian faith.” For followers of Jesus there has never been a more important time to know what we believe, why we believe, and how to share our faith with an increasingly skeptical world.

The apostle Peter urges us to “set apart the Messiah as Lord in your hearts, and always be ready to give a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you” (1 Peter 3:15).

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